Let’s work for change in Indian Education system #LearnNotEducate #BlogchatterProjects

“The goal of education is not to increase the amount of knowledge but to create the possibilities for a child to invent and discover, to create men who are capable of doing new things.”

Jean Piaget

 

#LearnNotEducate was something that was born out of the general apathy towards education system that I saw and felt in the young generation.

Let’s Learn not just Educate is a way to highlight satisfying alternative careers and busting myths related to traditional safe careers that will help the future generation choose wisely

A time when they should be brimming with ideas, discussing thoughts that could change the world or just be dreaming big, they were generally stressed, clue-less about the future or too worried about it not being mainstream. This just didn’t feel right.

Just then #BlogchatterProjects was announced and I took that as an opportunity to spread the word and ask for inputs for the idea of #LearnNotEducate.

From my end I looked for alternative careers that were satisfying and feeding the soul. I encouraged people to register for the same, so that I could bring in more stories about how the youth can follow their dreams and be successful too!

Response to Campaign

I did not expect the response that I got!

3,59,307 impressions in just 20 days with over 50 people talking about it!

More than 3,00,000 impressions for the #LearnNotEducate in just 20 days

I understand its nowhere near revolutionizing education in India, but the whole fact that so many people are interested in talking about it and have similar thoughts is encouraging! I as a Mom of two and a freelancer didn’t think my voice mattered, but this was definitely something that I found comforting.

Twitter poll to understand how people feel

A simple question – Do you believe there should be a change in the education system in India brought about some interesting answers and thoughts.

Many people had many voices and it was interesting to see their perspective

Varadarajan Ramesh – Education should be made affordable. These days running a school is a profitable business. Institutions charge preposterous fees for even Montessori. This should change pronto.

Deepa Gandhi  – There are is a need for a bigger change not only in the education system but mentality of people in our country towards it.

Varsha Bagadia – Absolutely! We need a more practical-based approach. Children who have an inclination towards specific subjects should be allowed to pursue only them.

Vikram Kamboj The education in #India should be made intellectually challenging and should questions assumptions rather than based on the rote memorization technique and orthodoxy.

This is just part one! I will be doing a similar round up about my project, and the way I see the future in 1st week of Jan, so stay tuned!

read the other articles from #LearnNotEducate

Shubha Surendra- A culinary artist

Vasudha Gokhale – A counselor and pediatric physiotherapist

Priti Talwalkar – A classical Singer

Snehal Pradhan – A cricketer

I am continuing with #LearnNotEducate series and those who wish to share their alternative careers with the world, please fill in this Google Form and I will get back to you

Music as a promising career – Interview with Priti Talwalkar #BlogchatterProjects

Singing or music has come into limelight with all the numerous singing competitions that have the capability of making someone a star overnight, however what goes behind the success is what we are here to see today.

I met up with Mrs. Priti Talwalkar, a professional classical and light music vocalist to understand what it takes to be a singer! Having a great voice is just half of the picture. Read this interview to understand the passion and the effort required to be a trained singer. An alternative career, that if followed with passion and dedication can give you money and fame.

Aachievements of Priti

When did you start learning singing?

I started learning music in 6th std from Mrs. Swarada Sathe. After Visharad I started learning Jaipur-atrauli gharana gayaki from Smt. Manik Bhide (senior disciple of Smt. Kishori Amonkar and a great singer of jaipur Atrauli gharana). I completed sangeet alankar under guidance of manik tai and smt. Mukta Bhide. Presently I am learning from pt. Bhalchandra Tilak, another stalwart of jaipur gayaki.

When did you decide to make it your career?

I always liked classical music the most and after 10th I decided to pursue music besides my college studies. I opted for arts so that I could focus on music properly.

Are there any professional degrees or exams for being a well-trained singer?

There are graduation, post graduation degree exams at the university level. One can do PhD after M.A in music. There are institutions like Gandharv Mahavidyalay where these exams can be given externally.

What are the future prospects in this field?

Future prospects in this field :

  • Job as a Music teacher in schools, university.
  • Private tutions or teaching in private institutes.
  • Performing artist in classical, light music.
  • There are other opportunities like playback singing, singing for albums, jingles, etc.


What are your tips for the parents of such students?

Parents should realize the ability of the kids and encourage them to acquire proper training. Help them get over the stage fright by making them sing whenever there are opportunities. Parents should treat this career equally important as any other career like doctor, engineer, etc.

What should a student keep in mind when choosing singing as a career?

According to me one should like singing very much and be passionate about it. With the help of the guru (teacher) try to find out whether you are ready to become a singer. Competitions, exams, singing in front of the audience will help to improve.  This can be a full time career. Proper training and riyaz are the most important things to become successful in this field.

If you follow an alternative career or know someone who does, fill up this google form

I will be glad to feature you in my upcoming series

Culinary Arts – A satisfying career option – Interview Shubha Shree Surendra #BlogChatterProjects

Everybody need not be an Engineer or a Doctor! The mindset that only mainstream careers mean something, is wrong. The whole month of December, I am looking at alternative careers that can be satisfying as well as rewarding.

I caught up with a 21 year old student pursuing culinary arts. You might wonder what that is! I had the same thoughts, so I did a bit of research online.

What is culinary arts?

In really simple terms, culinary art refers to the process of cooking and arranging food. How many of you thought about ‘MasterChef‘? I know, I did! It piqued my interest, so I decided to do an interview with her. Following are the excerpts from it.

Today we interview Shubha Shree Surendra who is pursuing culinary arts at the North Shore International Academy, Auckland, NZ.

What kind of background is required to apply for this course?

Education wise- you could be anything above a 12th pass student. There are age groups from 17 to 50+ at this institute.
but most importantly- one must have LOTS of patience, determination, physical and mental strength for this course.

Are there entrance tests? when should one start preparing?

Not really, most institutes do not require any prior knowledge or technical skills for this course. However, interviews and cover letters play an important role in fixing yourself a spot at any skill-based institute. Questions are usually based on how passionate you are towards the course as well as WHY you chose this field.

What is the course structure like?

The course that I am doing is a LEVEL 4 And 5 in culinary arts (Doing both levels is optional, but recommended if you want a decent position in the industry).
this is a 2-year course, consisting of 4 terms. You will be taught A-Z of culinary foundation through the 2 years – right from holding your knife to presenting a completed dish.

difference between hotel management and culinary arts?

The culinary arts refer to professions that involve preparing and cooking food. Culinary artists often are compared with restaurant managers in both education and career scope. Generally, the major differentiating factor for culinary artists and hotel management students are the specific college programs, the type of training and experience involved and the actual duties associated with each job. A culinary arts program will have subjects like nutrition and sensory evaluation, American cuisine, international cuisine and meat science. Management programs, in contrast, focus on educating individuals on how to operate the restaurant from a business management perspective.

What are the career prospects?

At the end of 2 years, you will be a certified chef, capable of working at any restaurant/hotel- positions may vary with experience, skill, etc. Other job options could be a personal chef, food stylist, cookbook author, food scientist, and so on.

some tips for students looking for a similar course?

Being a chef is not as easy as people presume, it involves a lot of physical and mental dedication every single day. For a chef, the holiday season is the busiest so forget partying during New year’s or vacationing during long weekends- this is when you’d be expected to show up in the kitchen. Do not join this profession if you are not passionate/interested in cooking; a lot of people I know have ended up choosing this course because they think they have no other option or they want to give this a “try”. Take my word, you will not be happy if you cannot give this your 100%.
what some people also don’t know is that cleaning and maintenance of hygiene plays a major role in the kitchen so expect to wash dishes when you enter the industry- that is how you grow and learn.

The kitchen is a hot, loud, noisy, busy but extremely satisfying place with a high swear-word frequency: be mentally prepared.

Can these courses be done in India? what should a student look for while choosing an institute?

India has several schools/colleges that offer a course in hotel management but only a handful that offer a mainstream culinary course.
Personally, I did not enjoy my experience in the culinary college I studied at, in India. Most Indian schools have a different approach with the education system, but then again- it’s just a personal opinion. There are 100’s of wonderfully talented chef’s that Indian schools have produced as well.
My advice before choosing your school would be: RESEARCH. Do thorough research of the school you choose. Ask questions, do not hold back. One tip would be to ask previous alumni- the ones who are not mentioned on the college website, if you want honest answers.

What is the process of applying for foreign universities and what should the student keep in mind?

Pretty much the same goes for any institute across the world. Do thorough research before choosing what fits your criteria and vision. Few things to keep in mind:
– know your rights, rules and regulations of the country before choosing.

  • If you wish to work during your study period, find out visa restrictions and availability of jobs.
  • Research everything about the country- from cost of living to future opportunities (if you wish to stay back).
  • Most students apply for universities/ colleges through an agent- I did too. It is a much faster and easier way of application as they help make sure all criteria are met and processes complete.
  • Most countries require test of language. Exams like IELTS/TOEFL, etc can be attempted, based on what the country accepts.

Last Thoughts

I hope this was an informative interview, the way it was for me. And I sincerely hope this will help more students and parents choose from the various career avenues that are now available.

Are you following your passion and have chosen an alternate career? Or maybe you know someone who has. Connect with me on nehatambe.dm@gmail.com or fill in the form below!Have any queries or wish to add more information or share this post? Share it with #LearnNotEducate

Are we raising a generation of escapists and cowards? My reason to start #LearnNotEducate

A bright student kills herself when court passes directive supporting National level entrance exams for medical

Every hour one student commits suicide in India

The most shocking was the Rayan International murder, where a XI standard student murdered a small child just to postpone his exam and parent teacher meet!

What have we come to? Is it easier for children to be murderers than face an exam or Parent Teacher Meet? Is your personal life, so immaterial that you prefer giving it up than standing up and finding second chances? Have we made our future generation so weak and a coward? If this is the coming generation how are they going to face the many challenges that life throws at them?

Questions like these and many more were hounding me since I read that article and it made me wonder if we have messed up our kids future in the name of ‘no pressure childhood’

We seem to be swinging like a pendulum – from too much pressure to absolutely no pressure. Is this really a workable solution?

Child’s Exposure

The current system of no exams, no punishment, no negative words and no failing, though established with good intentions seem to be working adversely. No exams mean the child has no idea of how well he is doing. No Negative remarks mean the parents have no idea if they need to help their child in a certain subject. I certainly don’t support corporal punishments or failing a child, but regular feedback good or bad is essential for the child to develop. Introducing vocational courses in school level and a possible option of making that a field of study from high school itself might help in easing the pressure. The child will be exposed to a variety of field of education apart from the traditional 8-9 subjects taught in school.

Parental Responsibility

We can’t just sit back and say “We have been paying enough fees to the school so the responsibility lies with the school to educate my child” We are paying for quality education, but if the child needs extra support in certain subjects we need to help. Not every child will be a topper, we need to accept that and let them blossom at their pace. A child might have talents in other areas – be it dance, singing, elocution, sports or craft. As parents it is our duty to let them explore and help them be the best version of themselves in whichever field that interests them. Not expecting the child to be an all-rounder and ensuring that he/she gets enough time and exposure to follow their passion might help in creating world-class sportsmen, musicians and toastmasters.

Everyone need not be a Doctor or an Engineer

This has been amply proven in the past few years, when many engineers have turned authors or musicians. I am not saying a child will figure it out when he is a kid, but as parents if the child chooses a different profession than the main-stream careers, we need to be supportive of them. Saturation of  a few traditional course is not only going to create intense competition in that field but will also inhibit a child. Dignity of labor should be ingrained right from childhood. An environmentalist or a pet-trainer is an equally respectable profession as an engineer or a doctor for the simple reason that we need them and they help a society function, just like any other profession.

World is their oyster

Instead of everyone running in the same rat-race, lets help our children blossom. See the international curriculum where there is equal focus on learning vocational and non-vocational courses. We need a change in mindset and a strong belief that talent and intelligence is not limited to bookish knowledge and 99% marks. As seen in the past – World Leaders, Entrepreneurs and even Sportsmen haven’t scored an A in the exams but have been an A-lister in life!

If you know someone who is following a satisfying alternative career or you are doing one, do fill the form below. My goal with #LearnNotEducate is to showcase to the children and their parents that passionate people can create amazing lives – a bad result is not the end of the world.